To top
GRS Precision Shooting Tutorials
GRS Precision Shooting Tutorials
GRS Precision Shooting Tutorials

 

Some say the tools do not make the craftsman, but we say that one should learn to use one's tools to one's ultimate advantage. Here follow some pointers to make the best of your rifle.

 


 

 

Assuming you are using optics on your rifle, take the time to teach yourself the basics of your optical system - the more you understand the intricacies of it, the better you'll master the results of your shooting. No matter how fast and strongly it leaves your rifle's barrel, a bullet is an object with a mass and surface, therefore affected by the pull of gravity and the flow of the wind. The further you are from the target, the more relevant those forces become, and the only way to establish a useful cause-and-effect relationship between those variables is by a sequence of trial, error and adjustments dialled into the scope.

Photo of GRS Oscar, Eivind, Jerry, measuring distances on range
Photo of GRS Oscar, Eivind, Jerry, measuring distances on range
Photo of GRS Oscar, Eivind, Jerry, measuring distances on range
No matter the brand or the make, your optics will have the following common systems, sequenced starting closest to your eye: ocular optics - with focusing ring and magnification ring + elevation adjustment dial to compensate the reading for the fall-off that will increase with increasing distance + windage adjustment ring to compensate the reading for the significant wind direction that will affect the bullet's travel + objective optics, which are traditionally fixed but may include controls for active beam systems that aid the fine adjustments in higher specification scopes.

 

 

The more you know about how physics affect the complex interaction between all variables - you, your rifle, your bullets, all the way to the final results, the better the final results. Then move onto the details of the shape, weight, type of gunpowder, terminal velocity, deviations, of bullets, Then learn more about different types of barrels, and how their interior surfaces affect these complex interactions of forces .

 

Photo of GRS Warg, complete rifle o tripod, longrange
Photo of GRS Warg, complete rifle o tripod, longrange
Photo of GRS Warg, complete rifle o tripod, longrange
All bullets follow a parabolic trajectory once they leave the barrel. As its flight progresses, the gravity force pulling the bullet down will be proportionally stronger and the drag of the bullet piercing the air will make progression increasingly slower. The "bullet drop" is the distance the trajectory lays below the centerline of the bore. The line of sight crosses the trajectory at two distances. The distances at which the line of sight cross the bullet's trajectory are known as the weapon's "zero." At the firearm's zero there is no need for vertical correction on the firearms sights. Because of this proportionality of forces, the longer the shot is, the more angular correction should have to reach the target.

 

The way you position yourself and your rifle, the way you anchor the front of the rifle on a bipod or the center of the rifle on a tripo or a stand, the way you use your forearm our a rear bag as a support, all will affect the initial accuracy of your shot and the consistency of your shooting. Take a minute to consider these.

Photo of GRS arca-rail on a Ragnarok, in snow
Photo of GRS arca-rail on a Ragnarok, in snow
Photo of GRS arca-rail on a Ragnarok, in snow

Graphic All Stock Models
All Stock Models
Graphic All Stock Models
Graphic back to GRS FOR HUNTERS
back to GRS FOR HUNTERS
Graphic back to GRS FOR HUNTERS
Graphics for GRS FOR SHOOTERS
for GRS FOR SHOOTERS
Graphics for GRS FOR SHOOTERS
Graphic button All Accessories
button All Accessories
Graphic button All Accessories
Graphic button All Laminates
button All Laminates
Graphic button All Laminates
Graphic button All Composites
button All Composites
Graphic button All Composites